The science of remembering

Neuroscience and psychology show us that our brains don’t absorb and remember new knowledge well in big chunks. The most effective way to learn and remember new knowledge is with regular, repeated exposure to small pieces.

The Wranx platform uses precisely this approach with an algorithm that tailors it towards the areas that most need work for each individual employee.

Remembering not to forget

We know from the Ebbinghaus Forgetting Curve that we forget most of what we learn in a matter of days or weeks. We now also know that we remember much, much more when we’re exposed to information repeatedly over a period of time.

By testing what employees remember, Wranx identifies the areas that need more work and focuses on them to improve overall knowledge.

Repetition works. Repetition works. Repetition works.

“We believe that by leveraging Wranx we can help reinforce the knowledge gained during in-person training. Spaced Repetition helps drive retention and retention helps drive mastery.”

Vice President, VF Corporation

Statistic

Spaced Repetition studiers beat crammers by 111% after 70 days and 77% after a year.

More platform features

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  • Are you wondering why after training, you are unable to recall what you have just learnt? Adam Robinson, author of  What Smart Students Know said:  “Don’t confuse recognising information with being able to recall it.” This quote is important, as it highlights the common method of passive learning, which is the exact opposite how we want to retain information. We want to use active recall - encouraging our brain to work independently to retrieve past learnt information from your long term memory. To be able to retain new information, you have to work your brain harder and build new connections to be able to actually absorb the information.

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